How to Personalize Your Emails with Mailjet

Email personalization is a tactic used by a lot of brands today, but frankly not enough. We do it… do you? 😉Of course, there are good reasons for this. Personalized emails are much more likely to be opened and clicked, because in a endless feed of content, those messages tailored made for you are much more attractive. In fact, as you’ll see below, simply including a name in the subject line will increase open rates by 20%, boost sales leads by 31%, and reduce unsubscribes by 17%

In this article, we will dig deeper into:

  • Effective ways to personalize your emails.
  • Why using personalization in emails is important.
  • How to use Mailjet to personalize your emails.

 

When you look at the full benefits of email personalization, this is just the tip of the iceberg though.

What is email personalization?

When it comes to email, personalization means leveraging the information you collected about a customer to target their interests and personal attributes. It could be something as simple as using their first name, where they live, something they bought recently, or perhaps something based on their behaviour on your site like downloading content or saving an item in a check out cart.

In short, email personalization can help you:

  • Customize an email subject line to stand out in the inbox;
  • Increase the likelihood of an email being opened and clicked on, when the personalized content is previewed within the inbox;
  • Improve customer experience by sending the right content to the right person at the right time.

Why should you personalize your emails?

We’re sure that by now you’ve already received your fair share of emails with your name in the subject line. Well, something as simple as adding the contact’s name in the subject line can mean a 20% higher chance of getting your email opened.

And now if you receive an email with the subject “Hey Sarah! Find the perfect gift for you and your friends!”, wouldn’t you be interested?

But customizing the subject line is just the first step. Personalization allows you to tailor email content so the reader feels it has been handpicked for them. Personalized email messages improve click-through rates by an average of 14% and conversions by 10%.

As we predicted earlier this month, 2019 will be the year in which brands finally fully embrace relevant messages. Segmented and targeted emails could actually generate more revenue for you and your brand, so can you really afford to continue to neglect email personalization?

What do you need before you start using personalization?

To start personalizing your emails, you’ll obviously need to collect the relevant data from your subscribers, users, and customers. Any data that gives you deppers insights about an individual can be used, from their date of birth, to their city, to their cat’s name. The more information you collect, the more targeted your email campaigns can be. You can collect this data using signup forms and subscription widgets when people create an account or subscribe to your email list, as well as tracking behavioural data such as which links they click in your emails or website actions.

With signup forms and subscription widgets, apart from the standard name and email address information, you can collect extra data such as gender, location, birthday, etc. Capturing extra details helps you in creating more personalized and targeted emails.

How to add personalization to your emails using Mailjet

Mailjet offers standard (simple) personalization that can be easily used thanks to contact properties on Mailjet’s platform. This can be used directly on our email editor, Passport, without having to make any API calls to define the values. Standard personalization can be used on both marketing and transactional emails and can help you when you already have all the data you need stored as part of your contact properties. But what if you don’t?

Well, then there is the option of advanced personalization that could be used through Mailjet’s Email API if you have these values as properties in your CRM. This type of personalization can only be used on transactional emails. We will talk more about that in a future article. :-)

To use standard personalization, however, you just need two things:

  • All the variables already set up as contact properties, and added into your Mailjet account.
  • An amazing guide to learn how to set up the variables in your template (like this post? 😎).

If you need help creating and adding properties, click here.

So, what can we do with simple personalization? Almost anything we want, if the all the necessary information is uploaded to, or integrated with, Mailjet. You can personalize subject lines and content within the email with predefined values, such as your contact’s cat name (we’ll keep pushing this idea until someone uses it 😼)or the city they were born in.

How to personalize your emails using Mailjet’s Passport

Using personalization with our email editor, Passport, is really easy. Once you have your beautiful template ready, it will only take a few minutes to add in all the necessary variables. You will not need deep technical knowledge on how to code, or use any strange Klingon-sounding language to you.

A variable is the value a contact has for a certain property. For example if the property is “firstname” and your name is Jake, then in this case Jake will be the variable for the property “firstname”.

This is why we made it really easy for you to add a variable to the subject line or body of the email by just clicking two buttons. We’ll show you how easy it is to do this in the examples below.

In the subject line

When you’re creating a campaign, the second step in the process allows you to choose your email’s subject line.

Personalizing the subject line is something you can easily do right away. Just create your subject line and click on the “Insert variable” button wherever you want to add the variable.

variable-in-the-subject

A new window will pop up and you can choose the variable you want to use and set up a default value to show if the property’s not available for a particular contact.

values-for-variable

Here’s how the subject would look like in our editor.

subject-with-variable

If everything is set up correctly, the property will be replaced with the value that is associated with each contact once you send your email. And here’s how it will look in the inbox:

personalized-subject-in-inbox

But what happens if there is no value for some of the recipients?

This is when the default value comes into play, as it will be displayed for those contacts that haven’t provided information for that specific property (for this example, it could result in something like: Hey there, did you know about this?). Of course, if you are using variables, you will always want to have something set up as a default value, as otherwise that variable would be blank and the personalization wouldn’t really work with odd blank spots.

“Hey , did you hear about this?” is just a little too annoying.

In the content

And what can Mailjet do to help personalization the email’s content? Well… anything you want!

You can use personalization to add the name of the recipient once again, or anything else that is going to help you address your customers better, and send them the content they would like to receive.

This type of personalization can be used on both marketing and transactional emails. Although there is a slight difference when adding variables in marketing and transactional emails. The first step is either case is the same though: you’ll have to choose the tab ‘Variables’ from the option menu in the content block that you want to add your personalized content.

passport-toolbar-variable

Next, a window will pop up, which will be a bit different depending on whether you’re working on transactional or marketing templates.

Let’s have a look at what that pop up will look like when you’re creating your transactional templates:

adding-variable-passport

On your transactional templates the pop-up window will include the following types of variables:

  • Custom transactional variable: to be used when adding advanced personalization.
  • Contact property inked to the properties in your Mailjet contact list. The Contact property is the one we’ll be using to add standard personalization to your emails.

 

Just like we did before, all you need to do is choose the correct contact property and set your default value. Then, our system will compile the syntax and add it in the template. Easy, right?

And what about your marketing templates? Well, in that case, the pop up window that comes up will look something like this:

adding-marketing-variable-passport

You’ll be able to choose between two types of variables:

  • Contact property: which we’ll be using (as we’ve done before) to add that standard personalization.
  • Predefined tags: which can be used to add things like unsubscribe links, social sharing links, and more.

 

We won’t be looking into predefined tags today, but you can learn more about how we use them for things like unsubscribe links here.

Once you’ve defined the contact property and default value, your content will look like this:

variable-in-the-content

But in the recipient’s mailbox it will look just like this:

personalization-in-the-inbox

How to personalize your emails using MJML or HTML

Of course, if you are creating your emails using MJML or HTML, standard personalization is still an option for you. All you need to do is add this small piece of code into your email and our system will do the rest.

[[data:nameoftheproperty:”defaultvalue”]]

For example: [[data:firstname:”Everyone”]]

That’s all that’s needed on your side. Mailjet’s system will find the value associated with this property and replace it. This syntax can also be used in Passport, if you prefer to do everything manually.

Here’s how the same personalization we did above will look if it is done with MJML:

personalization-with-MJML

Once the email is sent, it will look the exact same way as the one created with Passport.

Summing Up

You can easily create a personalized email that will make everyone want to open and check your email (well maybe not everyone, but definitely a lot more people).

We’ve showed you how easily it is to personalize your email subject lines and content using our email builder, Passport, just by following these simple steps.

And if you think this is getting too easy and want to step up your personalization game, stay tuned to learn how to use advanced personalization and dynamic content!

Want to be the first to know about our new tutorials and useful guides? Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Linkedin, and Twitter!

Best Email Marketing Software Comparison

Looking for which email marketing software to choose but don’t know where to start? Whether you’re a developer, marketer, or an all-around freelancer, you need to send emails and even text messages, and you want the option that gives you the best bang for your buck. So, here, we are comparing some of the best email marketing services out there to see which one fits best for you.

Before starting, here are some important questions to consider:

  • How many emails do you send per month?
  • How many contacts are there in your lists?

Email Marketing Services at a Glance

MailChimp Mailjet Mailjet CampaignMonitor
Marketing Emails true true true
Transactional Emails (through Mandrill) true true
Marketing Automation true true true
GDPR Certification false true true
Sub-accounts true true true
SMS Marketing false false false
Transactional SMS false true true
Pricing €€€ €€€

All of the email marketing software here offer basic services that allow you to send marketing and transactional emails and do some email automation. With Mailchimp, however, you will need to go through a third-party email platform to send your transactional emails. Mailjet and Campaign Monitor also allows you to send transactional SMS (e.g notifications, confirmations, etc.).

Worried about GDPR-compliance? Mailjet and Campaign Monitor are there for you.

If you’re low on budget, Mailjet is up to 30x cheaper than Mailchimp on the same email volume.

Best Email Marketing Software for Marketing Emails

MailChimp Mailjet Mailjet CampaignMonitor
Intuitive email builder true true true
Template gallery true true true
Multiple A/B testing true true true
Advanced statistics true true true
Contact segmentation true true true

All of these ESPs are good for your marketing emails.

Best Emailing Software For transactional emails

 

MailChimp Mailjet Mailjet CampaignMonitor
SMTP relay true true true
Full API Access true true true
Transactional email builder false true true
Advanced templating language false true false
Real-time notifications on transactional emails false true false

Managing your transactional emails can quickly become a chore if you’re not a developer. Mailjet and Campaign Monitor both have email builders that are intuitive and don’t require any technical know-how. Mailjet also offers an advanced templating language, allowing you to create personalized, responsive emails.

Finally, Mailjet is the only ESP that includes the option to enable real-time notifications on transactional emails if an issue happens when sending them. This allows you to quickly manage your problems.

Best Email Marketing Software for Email Collaboration

MailChimp Mailjet Mailjet CampaignMonitor
Option of adding an unlimited number of users true false false
Creation of sub-accounts that allow you to separate different types of email sending false true false
Real-time collaboration on your emails false true false

Devising your email campaigns should be about teamwork and collaboration. Mailchimp and Mailjet understood this quite well. They offer the option to create an unlimited number of users and to give them specific roles. Mailjet allows users to create sub-accounts and separate different types of sending.

But only Mailjet allows users to collaborate on the same emails, in real-time, like in Google Docs. This is perfect to reduce time wasted in back-and-forths.

Pricing Comparison for the Best Email Marketing Software

MailChimp Mailjet Mailjet CampaignMonitor
Remove email marketing software logo in emails $10 $8.69 $11.40
Price for 30,000 emails per month $225 $8.69 $36.74
Dedicated IP Address false Free Starting at 150,000 emails false

Tight budget? Mailchimp can get quite expensive with their email marketing services. Mailchimp bases their prices on user contact lists, which can go up very quickly.

Mailjet allows you to send 30,000 emails for $8.69 per month on an annual plan. Clearly, Mailjet offers the best email marketing software for your money.

So have you made your choice, yet? We hoped these helped.

Which SMTP Port Should I Use with Mailjet?

Choosing an SMTP port can be tricky. If you’re configuring your email system to send or relay email, you’re probably wondering: “Which SMTP port should I use?”. Sounds tough…

To be honest, there are a few things to take into consideration. Do you need some kind of encryption? Or would this port be open at the recipient’s end for receiving emails? Does the email service provider you use support this port?

Yes, we know. There are so many things to think about, it’s easy to get lost… Which is why, in this article, we will help you find the answers you need to find the right configuration for you.

What is SMTP?

Simple Mail Transfer Protocol or (simply SMTP) is the basic standard that email servers use to send email to one another across the internet. SMTP is also used by some applications and services to relay their users to other email servers. Using a process called “store and forward,” SMTP moves your email across networks. It works closely with something called the Mail Transfer Agent (MTA) to send your communication to the right computer and email inbox. MTA is each software app used by email clients (e.g. Gmail, Outlook, Apple Mail, etc.)

SMTP could also be used as a TCP/IP protocol to receive emails, however, since it is limited in its possibility to queue messages at the receiving end, it is usually used only for sending. POP3 or IMAP protocols are used alongside SMTP for receiving emails that let the user save messages in a server mailbox and download them periodically from the server. Not so complicated now, right?

What is an SMTP port?

Let’s start with what is a port.

If we are talking about a networking port, it’s not like the ports that let you charge your computer or plug in your mouse to your computer. Ports actually have a very specific and very well defined meaning when it comes to digital communications

To understand how ports work, we need to take a step back and see what happens when computers communicate with each other on the internet.

Let’s say you are trying to reach mailjet.com. In this case, the Domain Name System (DNS) is converting this to the actual IP that is hidden behind the name of the site. In Mailjet’s case, this is 104.199.110.216. You probably could remember 4-5 IPs like ours, but who can actually remember more, or really… who would want to?

smtp-port-mailjet

So, now your server is requesting to connect you with this site from your ISP.

What’s next? Here’s where the port comes in handy.

We know that the address we want to reach and the port number (80 in this case) tells the server what it is you want it to do. You can think of the ports as the number of addresses you would like to reach. The IP address would be equivalent to the physical address of the recipient, and the port number might be the individual within the street that’s supposed to receive your letter.

In other words, a port is an endpoint to a logical connection. At the software level, within an operating system, a port is a logical construct that identifies a specific process or a type of network service.

The port number identifies what type of port it is. Some ports have numbers that are assigned to them by the IANA, and these are called the “well-known ports”, which are specified in RFC 1700.

Each port has two stats – open and closed. If the port is open, it means that you can establish a connection and transfer the information. If the port is closed, you won’t be able to reach it and the connection will fail.

You can actually check if a port is open or not by telnetting it. How to do this? That’s too much for this post, but you can learn more about it in this detailed article.

An SMTP port is one that is meant to be used for SMTP connections. Today, the most common SMTP ports are 25, 465, 587, or 2525. This doesn’t mean that they are the only ones, though. These few ports are the most used ones for these types of connection, and because of that they are almost always opened, which means you should be able to reach your destination. OK, we know that you are excited to learn more 😉

Mailjet’s SMTP relay

Mailjet’s robust delivery infrastructure routes billions of emails to the inbox every month. Our free SMTP relay could be set up in minutes and you will discover just how our powerful features can help you do more with less.

If you’re using Mailjet for sending your transactional emails through SMTP, it is pretty easy to set this up! Once you have created your amazing templates, you can follow this article to configure your SMTP connection. You can do this with any desktop client, such as Outlook or Thunderbird. But even better than that, you can use MTA and MDA, such as Postfix, exim and Exchange.

Of course, you can set up the SMTP relay with any technology that supports SMTP, so you can choose the perfect framework or language for you. What could be easier, right? 😎

Just add your API key as the username and secret key as the password and set up the host/smtp server in-v3.mailjet.com. And now, let’s see what ports we offer for you to use.

Port Purpose TLS SSL
25 Simple Mail Transfer Protocol Port Optional No
80 Hypertext Transfer Protocol Port Optional No
465 Authenticated SMTP over SSL Port No Yes
587/588 Email Message Submission Port Optional No
2525 The Alternative Port Optional No

You can see all the details for these ports below:

Port 25 – Simple Mail Transfer Protocol Port

Every systems administrator (at least of a certain age), knows that SMTP was designated to use port 25 in IETF Request For Comments (RFC) 821. Today, IANA, still recognizes Port 25 as the standard, default SMTP port.
Although port 25 continues to be the most common port for SMTP relaying, most modern SMTP clients could be blocking this port.
Why, you ask?
Port 25 is blocked on many networks because of the spam that has historically been relayed from compromised computers and servers. So, it is true that many ISPs and hosting providers block or restrict SMTP connections on port 25. This helps to cut down a number of unsolicited emails that are sent from their networks.
However, if you are managing an email server you can always decide to leave port 25 open and allow SMTP connection through it. You can implement other securitization on your server, such as frameworks and additional email verification to prevent the sending of spam.

You can use TLS encryption with port 25 with Mailjet.

Port 80 – Hypertext Transfer Protocol Port

Port 80 is the port number assigned to the commonly used internet communication protocol Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). It is the port from which a computer sends and receives web client-based communication and messages from a web server, and is used to send and receive HTML pages or data. This is the port that the server “listens to” or expects to receive from a web client, assuming that the default was taken when the server was configured or set up.

And you know what the best thing is about using this port? It is open 99.9% of the time! So the chances of your email not getting through are pretty slim. Everybody needs access to the internet and they need this port open.

You can use TLS encryption with port 80 as well.

Port 465 – Authenticated SMTP over SSL Port

IANA initially assigned port 465 for an encrypted version of SMTP, called SMTPS. By the end of 1998, IANA had reassigned this port number to a new service. But still many services continue to offer the deprecated SMTPS interface on port 465. We are one of these services. 😉

The purpose of port 465 is to establish a port for SMTP to operate using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). SSL is commonly used for encrypting communications over the internet. Typically, you will use this port only if your application demands it.

This is the best way to use a more secure SMTP connection. Port 465 is the only one with which we are accepting SSL encryption.

Port 587 and Port 588 – Email Message Submission Port

Nowadays, port 587 is used for secure submission of email for delivery. Most of the client software are configured to use this port to send your messages. Almost all mail servers support this port. But even if the mail server supports it, it may or may not be open for mail submissions.

With Mailjet, this port is open. To see if it is the same for your destination, you can use the telnet technic.

Using port 587, you can couple it with TLS encryption while using Mailjet. The same applies for port 588.

Port 2525 – The Alternative Port

Port 2525 is not an official SMTP port, and it is not sanctioned by the IETF nor IANA. Almost every ESP supports the use of Port 2525, even though this is not an official SMTP port. It could be used as an alternative to port 587 for SMTP, in case all of the other pots are being blocked.

Port 2525 is probably the most used by users that are hosted on Google Compute Engine and experiencing connectivity issues with port 587.

This port also supports TLS encryption.

What we learned together

Now you can say that you know what an SMTP and network port is- well done, you! Even better, you now know the purpose of some ports and that you can use them for SMTP connections and relays. You can also check if a port is opened in your configuration or the recipient’s one using telnet. 😉

We are sure that, now, if you have any issue with the SMTP relay between Mailjet and your own server, you will know what to test and see if there is an issue with the port connection.

Want to know more about SMTP and Mailjet? Follow us on Facebook and Twitter to be the first to know about our new articles!

How To Code A Welcome Email With MJML

You already know we’re working on a series of tutorials to show you how to create and send awesome transactional emails step by step, using MJML, our open-source email framework, and Mailjet’s templating language. Each tutorial covers a very common use-case, providing a large set of examples, code snippets, and nice visuals.

Today, we’re going to see how to implement an efficient welcome email. Here’s what you’ll find in this post.

 

A templating language for your transactional emails

You already know that flexibility and personalization are a must-have in the email industry. Transactional emails imply more and more complex business logic, and one can often struggle to try to juggle a lot of different templates, when they could just have one personalized email that adapts to several use cases.

Having a separate template for men and another one for women, or creating specific campaigns to recommend different things based on your customer’s previous purchases is not viable. It is in this kind of situations that a templating language comes in handy.

Even if you could potentially write your own, to be able to implement a tokenizer and a grammar, you’d need to have a good knowledge in the field and might end up reinventing the wheel when you could have been focusing on your core business instead…

You could instead use nice libraries such as Handlebars, Jinja or Twig, but then you’ll still need to write or host a dedicated service to handle the templating processing.

Mailjet’s Templating Language

At Mailjet, we know the value of a fully integrated templating language, which is why we created our own templating language with our Transactional Send API in mind. Our idea: one template to rule them all, just with a single API call.

So, let’s recap: MJML for producing responsive HTML emails without effort, plus a templating language to bring them to life with conditional blocks and variables.

This combo can change your life as a developer. But, enough words, you’ll definitely want some action. That’s why we’ve decided to show you how to create and send awesome transactional emails, step by step.

 

The “How to code” tutorial: what you need to know

We’re rolling out a series of tutorials, all of which will explore a very common use-case, providing numerous examples, code snippets and nice visuals. We’ve even created an easy-to-execute tool, written with NodeJS, to test emails under actual conditions. To use it, you’ll just need valid credentials for both MJML API and Mailjet Transactional Send API, but don’t worry if you’re a newcomer: applying for the MJML API beta and creating a Mailjet account are totally free.

Our “How To Code” series has four parts. Check them out now:

 

How to code a welcome email: Quick Introduction

We know you are an email veteran, and the double opt-in has no more secrets for you. So, during the signup process, you asked your user to confirm their email address. This verification step is now over. You can open yet another bottle of champagne, you have one true new user interested in your product. Congratulations.

But then you start to wonder. It could be that users browse your website right now, or come back later. And you know people. Chances are, they’ll have other things to do, they’ll forget and never come back. So you need to grab their attention again. Why not use the valid email address they offered you willingly?

Welcome emails are indeed a powerful way to communicate because users are expecting them. When you enter a store as a consumer, you expect friendly greetings, useful information or good advice. While this behavior is common for most customers, that doesn’t imply they’re all the same. It is important to take your user’s tastes or habits into account, in order to create relevant messages. We can see you starting to panic: how many templates would you have to write?

Don’t freak out! Leveraging the power of our templating language, we will show you how to create a customized welcome series, using only a single template. In this tutorial, we will show you how to:

  1. Create blocks that display different elements according to your user data (location, gender… think segmentation!).
  2. Set a templating language variable and leverage it to display personalized data.
  3. Use templating language functions to transform text.

Example: welcome email

 

How to code a welcome email template: Over to Github!

Looking for some extra help in coding your welcome emails? You’re in the right place. We’ll tackle all the points above, and more, in our dedicated Github tutorial for coding welcome email templates with MJML.

Our Github tutorial includes:

  • Clear explanations.
  • Code samples you can use while working on your welcome emails.
  • Examples of a welcome emails and its different parts.

Ready to start writing an awesome welcome email template?

Time to jump over to Github.

Jump over to our Github tutorial for welcome emails!


We’ve also created an easy-to-execute tool written with NodeJS to test emails under real conditions. To use it, you’ll just need valid credentials for both MJML API and Mailjet Transactional Send API, but don’t worry if you’re a newcomer – applying to join the MJML API beta and creating a Mailjet account are totally free.

Want to say “hi” to the team? Come and chat with us on Twitter.

How To Code An Email Receipt Template With MJML

We are developers, like you. And what we hate above all in coding is to repeat ourselves. So when it comes to writing email templates, we want to provide our users with the best tools to produce content in the most efficient way possible, whether you want to know how to code an e-receipt or just update your welcome emails.

To speed up the development of responsive emails, we’ve already told you about MJML, the open-source email framework we’ve created. If you’re not familiar with it, go check it out right away. You can thank us later.

But even if MJML can help you save quite a lot of time and ease the process, you’ll probably want more. We hear you.

 

A templating language for your transactional emails

Today, flexibility and personalization are a must-have in the email industry. Transactional emails imply more and more complex business logic, and one can often struggle to try to juggle a lot of different templates, when they could just have one personalized email that adapts to several use cases.

Having a separate template for men and another one for women, or creating specific campaigns to recommend different things based on your customer’s previous purchases is not viable. It is in this kind of situations that a templating language comes in handy.

OK, let’s be a bit naive and accept that you could write your own. But to be able to implement a tokenizer and a grammar, you need to have a good knowledge in the field and, at the end of the day, you might just be reinventing the wheel when you could have been focusing on your core business instead…

You could instead use nice libraries such as Handlebars, Jinja or Twig, but then you’ll still need to write or host a dedicated service to handle the templating processing.

Mailjet’s Templating Language

We have the solution. Because at Mailjet we know the value of a fully integrated templating language, we created our own templating language with our Transactional Send API in mind. Our idea: one template to rule them all, just with a single API call.

So, let’s recap: MJML for producing responsive HTML emails without effort, plus a templating language to bring them to life with conditional blocks and variables.

This combo can change your life as a developer. But, enough words, you’ll definitely want some action. So we’ve decided to show you how to create and send awesome transactional emails, step by step.

 

The “How to code” tutorial: what you need to know

We’re rolling out a series of tutorials, all of which will explore a very common use-case, providing numerous examples, code snippets and nice visuals. We’ve even created an easy-to-execute tool, written with NodeJS, to test emails under actual conditions. To use it, you’ll just need valid credentials for both MJML API and Mailjet Transactional Send API, but don’t worry if you’re a newcomer: applying for the MJML API beta and creating a Mailjet account are totally free.

Our “How To Code” series has four parts. Check them out now:

 

How to code a receipt email template: Quick Introduction

From online shoe stores to indie music platforms, any company selling a product online will have to send a receipt. You may think this is a simple task but, actually, there are several elements you’ll need to consider.

Let’s review them briefly, before jumping over to our tutorial, from the more obvious ones to the less:

  1. You will have to loop over the list of items (cart, abandoned cart, recommendations, etc.) and display them.
  2. You need to display the price and may have to do some calculus directly in the email logic (Total, VAT and other taxes). Be careful, as you may use different currencies!
  3. You need to include some basic billing information (billing address, order number, etc.), but you can also provide more personalized information (for instance, you could warn your users that their registered credit card is about to expire).
  4. If there’s shipping, you should display the delivery address.
  5. Your user may have to forward the e-receipt for accounting purposes, so you should ease this workflow.
  6. You can insert marketing content to your receipt, such as a history of previous items or new promotions based on what your user just bought.
  7. If your website supports multiple languages, your emails should too.

Preview of the receipt email template

 

How to code a receipt email template: Over to Github!

Sounds like something you’re already doing? Or are you not sure how to implement some of these elements?

Worry not, we’ll tackle all these needs, and more, in our dedicated Github tutorial for coding email receipt templates with MJML.

On our Github tutorial you’ll find:

  • Detailed explanations.
  • Code samples to implement and adapt.
  • Examples of a receipt email and its different parts.

Ready to see it in action?

Time to jump over to Github.

Github tutorial: How to code a receipt email

 

Mailjet Helps Facilitate Inter-team Collaboration

If you are already a customer or you follow our news, you know that over the past few years we have been taking the use of our tools very seriously, allowing you to better collaborate with your teams.
Now, we have decided to go a step further and offer even more new features:

  • Advanced restrictions
  • Blocked sections
  • Draft mode

More Sophisticated Advanced Restrictions To Share Only What You Choose

Now, you have the possibility of giving access to your account or sub-accounts to other employees. Now, you can go even further in the management of access sharing by selecting advanced restrictions.

Improve exchanges between your teams by giving specific roles to your employees. You can also set who has the right to block sections, manage your gallery or edit your e-mail templates.

In your account, head to My Account > Account Sharing. Here, you can invite new users and set which pages and which of your account features you would like to give them access to.

Let’s take a specific example: you want to invite your designer to create templates on your account, but you don’t want to let her send an email, because you would like to validate each of her creations before they are used.  

Simply select the role “Designer” when you invite her to your account. She can access all the templates but can only save them in ‘Draft’ status. She will also be able to block the formatting of some sections to prevent other employees from modifying them.

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If you don’t want to choose one of the predefined roles – Accountant, Developer, Marketer or Designer – you can choose the “Customized” option and individually select the pages or features to which you would like your colleague to have access.

EN-Personalized-Menu

You now know all you need to ensure that your team members only manage actions they are responsible for, according to the roles you yourself will have set.

This feature is available only for Premium subscriptions starting with Cristal. The number of people to which advanced restrictions can be applied is limited based on subscription type.

Block Section Editing

When you edit a template, you can now choose to block one or several of its sections to prevent one of your employees from editing or deleting them. That way, you can better protect the design of your emails and make work easier for your teams. As for your employees, they can focus on tasks that are assigned to them.

  • When you click on a section, blue edges appear:

Locked Sections

  • Click on the lock and a pop-up will appear to let you select the limitations you would like to implement for each section:

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  • You can choose to:
    • Completely lock the section so that it can no longer be modified or deleted
    • Authorize only changes to text and images so that the formatting of your section can no longer be modified

Users for whom you have not assigned modification rights for the locked sections will be limited when editing a template. If you have completely locked the section, no access will be allowed (as shown in the image below). If you have blocked editing for formatting only, they can update content without having any impact on design.

Section Locked

This feature is only available for Premium subscriptions.

Edit Your Template Safely In Draft Mode

You can now edit your email without needing to publish it. Why is this useful? You can modify your template without worrying about affecting a template which is already in use. While waiting for a template to be validated, you can simply save it as a draft.

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Saving a template in draft mode also lets you authorize members of your team to work on it without necessarily granting the right to publish, leaving you as the designated person in charge of publishing the final version.

 

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That way, your marketing templates in draft status won’t be visible in your gallery when you create a new campaign. Additionally, changes made to an automated template won’t be applied to a workflow once it has been published. Lastly, the final ID of a transactional template will not be provided unless you have published it, thus preventing you from affecting an email in production.

You can head right over to your account to implement advanced restrictions and make collaboration easier between your teams.

We hope you like these new features. Feel free to tell us what you think on Twitter.

Manage Your Templates Easily With Mailjet’s Gallery

A few days ago, we came out with quite a few improvements and features. Today, we’re taking a closer look at the ones that involve managing your templates, to help you get the best use out of them. These new features will let you organize yourself better and save precious time.

Template-Gallery

As a reminder, Mailjet gives you free access to more than 50 templates to get inspired, but you can also create your own easily with our intuitive e-mail editor.

Find your templates easily in your Mailjet gallery

Once you’ve created or modified a template, you can save it and find it directly in your gallery. We have improved its interface so you can find the templates that interest you in just a few clicks.

A new scrolling menu to rank your templates

In your gallery, you’ll find a scrolling menu in the top-right corner  that allows you to organize your templates in the order that you like. You can now sort them by alphabetical order, last modified or creation date.

OrderMenu-EN

Advanced search to find the template of your choice

In the top-left corner of your gallery, you now have access to a search field that lets you find one or several templates by searching by name, desired language or applied labels (learn more about labels below).

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Improved management of your templates

If you click on the small nut above your template to the right, you can choose from a variety of options. Since last year, you have been able to export templates to a sub account  or download your template in HTML or MJML in order to make collaboration easier with your teams.

Today, we have added two new options: adding categories and viewing editing history.

Adding categories to your templates

Most of our customers use Mailjet to create newsletters using different themes, and with more than twenty templates, it can be difficult to find your way around.

In order to quickly find the templates you’re interested in using, we have implemented labels. You can now add labels to your templates to easily find them in your gallery using their colour or apply a filter to group them together easily when you are searching for them from the search field.

In your template gallery, above the menu to the right:

  • Click on the Manage labels button

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  • Then on the button Create a label

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  • Give the name of your choice to your label and select a colour, then click on save and your label has been created!

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To add the label to a template:

  • Click on the nut on the template of your choice and then on Assign a label

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  • Select the label of your choice and click Save

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  • The label will appear on your template.

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This feature is only available for Premium subscriptions.

See publication history for your templates

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Hover your cursor over the template of your choice and a new “Preview & history” link will appear. Click on it and you’ll land on a template previsualization page where you can find up to the last 5 published versions of your e-mail. That way, if you’re not satisfied with the most recent changes you made to your template or if you want to see what it looked like before you made them, you can easily turn back the clock by selecting a previously published version.

 

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Now head to your template gallery to test out these new features.

We hope you like these new features. Feel free to tell us what you think on Twitter.

Facilitated Collaboration And Advanced E-mail Template Management, New At Mailjet!

Ho, ho, ho… No, it’s not Christmas yet, but it’s easy to see why you might think so at Mailjet!

Have you been very nice this year? Probably, because today we have six gifts for you that you can unwrap under the tree (the tree being your Mailjet account – play along ;)).

We are proud to announce the arrival of a bunch of improvements and new features. In a few minutes, you will learn about everything you can now benefit from as soon as you next log in.

A more advanced collaboration with Mailjet

In order to prevent the back and forth in the steps leading to template publication, we have implemented features to let you take on the role of each of your team’s members.

  • 🎁 A lock to secure your favorite sections

Locked Sections

Set which employees can edit a template’s sections to protect the content or your design.

This feature is only available for Premium subscriptions.

  • 🎁 Advanced restrictions for better collaboration

EN-Personalized-Menu

 

Improve collaboration between your teams using advanced settings to define who has the right to block sections, manage your gallery or edit your templates.   

This feature is only available for Premium plans, on Crystal and above.

A more advanced template management

To prevent errors and make it easier to fix them, here are two new features that will put your mind at ease.

  • 🎁 Publication history to go back in time

History-Dashboard-EN

Select the template of your choice and see up to five previous versions published, allowing you to go back to a previous version at any moment.  

  • 🎁 Draft status for your templates

EN-menu-Save-Draft

Save changes to your templates without needing to publish them by using Draft mode. That way, you can work on your Marketing, Automated or Transactional email templates without affecting those already in production. Additionally, you can allow some members of your team to continue working on drafts without granting them the right to publish.

Better organization, effortlessly

Since we know that there is nothing greater than immediately finding what you’re looking for, these features let you gain precious time:   

  • 🎁 Advanced search to find things in the bat of an eyelash

EN-SearchMenu

In your gallery, you now have access to a search field that lets you find templates or template categories by simply typing the name, the desired language or the label of your choosing.

OrderMenu-EN

We also added a new scrolling menu to let you organize your templates the way you like. You can now sort them in alphabetical order, or by last modified or creation date.

  • 🎁 Labels to better organize your template gallery

FR-6-LabelCreated

You can now add labels to your templates to easily find them in your gallery using their color or apply a filter to group them together easily when you are searching for them in the search field.

This feature is only available for Premium subscriptions.

So, isn’t it time to go make a hot chocolate, set your computer on your lap(yes, using it as a heating pad is a well-known trick) and unwrap all your gifts?

Stay tuned – in the next few days, we will present these new features in greater detail so that you can get the most out of them.

Come meet us in person at Mailjet ! :)
While you wait, tell us what you think of your gifts on Twitter and who knows, maybe some new gifts will land under the tree before Christmas ;).